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This page pertains to UD version 2.

Case: case

Values: Abe Abl Cau Com Cmp Dat Ela Gen Ill Ine Lat Loc Nom Prl Tem Tra

Case is an inflectional feature of nouns and other parts of speech (adjectives, numerals, pronouns, postpositions) that are noun phrase heads.

Case helps specify the role of the noun phrase in the sentence. The various cases have different distributions as basic or indefinite cases (1–16) in relation to their definite singular (3), definite plural (3) and possessive (-12) paradigms.

Erzya morphology distinguishes fifteen cases: Abe, Abl, Cau, Com, Cmp, Dat, Ela, Gen, Ill, Ine, Lat, Loc, Nom, Prl, Tem, Tra (this ordering is alphabetical, some authors use different names or even numbers for identifying these cases.)

Abe: abessive

Examples

Abl: ablative

Examples

Cau: causative

Examples

Com: comitative

Examples

Cmp: comparative

Examples

Dat: dative

Examples

Ela: elative

Examples

Gen: genitive

The genitive in Moksha indicates the possessor. It is also one of the morphological markers for direct object and adpositional complement. In the indefinite declension the genitive, when attached to words with material source or origin referents, the resulting form is considered by many grammarians as an adjectival derivation form.

Examples

Ill: illative

Examples

Ine: inessive

The inessive may be used to express (1) locative state and (2) the instrument function.

Examples

Lat: lative

Examples

Loc: locative

Examples

Nom: nominative

The base form, typically used as a citation form (lemma). The nominative form is used in the morphosyntactic funtion of subject and predicate. While the definite declension usually indicates topic (subject) function, the indefinite declension often appears in presentation of new information, such as in existential sentences. Possessor indexing on the nominative allows for both interpretations.

The indefinite nominative singular is one of the complement forms for postpositional constructions; the others being the indefinite and definite genitive forms.

The indefinite nominative singular and plural are used as indefinite object forms; the others being the indefinite and definite genitive forms.

Examples

Prl: prolative

Examples

Tem: temporalis

Examples

Tra: transative

Examples


Case in other languages: [am] [apu] [arr] [bej] [bg] [cs] [eme] [en] [ess] [et] [fi] [ga] [gn] [grc] [gub] [hu] [hy] [kmr] [koi] [kpv] [mdf] [myu] [myv] [pcm] [pt] [qpm] [ru] [sl] [sv] [tpn] [tr] [tt] [u] [uk] [urb] [urj]