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This page still pertains to UD version 1.

Degree: degree of comparison

Degree applies to adjectives and adverbs.

Pos: positive, first degree

This feature is not used.

Cmp: comparative, second degree

The quality of one object is compared to the same quality of another object. For an account of how the comparative is morphologically realized in Ancient Greek see Smyth 1920: 86-90 and 101. For the the use of the comparative see Smyth 1920: 279-282.

Examples

Sup: superlative, third degree

The quality of one object is compared to the same quality of all other objects within a set. This corresponds in Ancient Greek to the the relative superlative, which can be morphologically realized like the absolute superlative. For an account for the morphology of the superlative see Smyth 1920: 86-90. For the the use of the superlative see Smyth 1920: 282-283.

Examples

Abs: absolute superlative

The quality of the given object is so strong that there is hardly any other object exceeding it. The quality is not actually compared to any particular set of objects. This corresponds in Ancient Greek to the the absolute superlative, which can be morphologically realized like the relative superlative. For an account for the morphology of the superlative see Smyth 1920: 86-90. For the the use of the superlative see Smyth 1920: 282-283.

Examples

References

Smyth, Herbert Weir. 1920. A Greek Grammar for Colleges. New York: American Book Company (Perseus Digital Library; Internet Archive).


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