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This page still pertains to UD version 1.

Features

Lexical features
PronType
NumType
Poss
Reflex
Inflectional features
Nominal Verbal
Gender VerbForm
Animacy Mood
Number Tense
Case Aspect
Definite Voice
Degree Person
Polarity

Animacy: animacy

There is no such feature in Portuguese.

Similarly to Gender (and to the African noun classes), animacy is usually a lexical feature of nouns and inflectional feature of other parts of speech (pronouns, adjectives, determiners, numerals, verbs) that mark agreement with nouns. It is independent of gender, therefore it is encoded separately in some tagsets (e.g. all the Multext-East tagsets). On the other hand, in Czech the (almost) only grammatical implications occur within the masculine gender, which is why the PDT tagset does not have animateness as separate feature and instead defines four genders: masculine animate, masculine inanimate, feminine and neuter. We follow the two-feature approach used in Multext-East (many languages) because it is safer.

edit Animacy

Aspect: aspect

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Aspect.

edit Aspect

Case: case

Case is usually an inflectional feature of nouns and, depending on language, other parts of speech (pronouns, adjectives, determiners, numerals, verbs) that mark agreement with nouns. In some tagsets it is also valency feature of adpositions (saying that the adposition requires its argument to be in that case).

Case helps specify the role of the noun phrase in the sentence, especially in free-word-order languages. For example, the nominative and accusative cases often distinguish subject and object of the verb, while in fixed-word-order languages these functions would be distinguished merely by the positions of the nouns in the sentence.

Since Portuguese is not a free-word-language, case is used only to describe (pronouns that inherited this feature from Latin.

We have three cases in Portuguese: nominative (Nom), dative (Dat) and accusative (Acc).

Examples

edit Case

Definite: definiteness or state

Definiteness is typically a feature of nouns, adjectives and articles. Its value distinguishes whether we are talking about something known and concrete, or something general or unknown. In Portuguese, this feature applies only to determiners. It can be marked on definite and indefinite articles.

Ind: indefinite

Examples

Def: definite

Examples

edit Definite

Degree: degree of comparison

Degree of comparison is typically an inflectional feature of some adjectives and adverbs.

Pos: positive, first degree

This is the base form that merely states a quality of something, without comparing it to qualities of others. Note that although this degree is traditionally called “positive”, negative properties can be compared, too.

Examples

Cmp: comparative, second degree

The quality of one object is compared to the same quality of another object.

Examples

Sup: superlative, third degree

The quality of one object is compared to the same quality of all other objects within a set.

Examples

Abs: absolute superlative

Some languages, as Portuguese, can express morphologically that the studied quality of the given object is so strong that there is hardly any other object exceeding it. The quality is not actually compared to any particular set of objects.

Examples

edit Degree

Gender: gender

Gender is usually a lexical feature of nouns and inflectional feature of other parts of speech (pronouns, adjectives, determiners, numerals, verbs) that mark agreement with nouns.

Masc: masculine gender

Nouns denoting male persons are masculine. Other nouns may be also grammatically masculine, without any relation to sex.

Examples

Fem: feminine gender

Nouns denoting female persons are feminine. Other nouns may be also grammatically feminine, without any relation to sex.

Examples

Unsp: unspecified

Unsp is used to tag words that can be masculine or feminine when the context is not enough to make clear its gender.

Examples

edit Gender

Mood: mood

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Mood.

edit Mood

NumForm: NumForm

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for NumForm.

edit NumForm

NumType: numeral type

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for NumType.

edit NumType

Number: number

Number is usually an inflectional feature of nouns and other parts of speech (pronouns, adjectives, determiners, numerals, verbs) that mark agreement with nouns.

Sing: singular number

A singular expression denotes one person, animal or thing.

Examples

Plur: plural number

A plural expression denotes several persons, animals or things.

Examples

Unsp: unspecified

Unsp is used to tag words that can be singular or plural when the context is not enough to make clear its number.

Examples

edit Number

Person: person

Person is typically feature of personal and possessive pronouns / determiners, and of verbs. On verbs it is in fact an agreement feature that marks the person of the verb’s subject. Person marked on verbs makes it unnecessary to always add a personal pronoun as subject and thus subjects are sometimes dropped (pro-drop languages).

1: first person

In singular, the first person refers just to the speaker / author. In plural, it must include the speaker and one or more additional persons.

Examples

2: second person

In singular, the second person refers to the addressee of the utterance / text. In plural, it may mean several addressees and optionally some third persons too.

Examples

3: third person

The third person refers to one or more persons that are neither speakers nor addressees.

Examples

edit Person

Polarity: whether the word can be or is negated

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Polarity.

edit Polarity

Poss: possessive

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Poss.

edit Poss

PronType: pronominal type

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for PronType.

edit PronType

Reflex: reflexive

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Reflex.

edit Reflex

Tense: tense

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Tense.

edit Tense

VerbForm: form of verb or deverbative

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for VerbForm.

edit VerbForm

Voice: voice

This document is a placeholder for the language-specific documentation for Voice.

edit Voice