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This page still pertains to UD version 1.

POS tags

Open class words Closed class words Other
ADJ ADP PUNCT
ADV AUX SYM
INTJ CCONJ X
NOUN DET
PROPN NUM
VERB PART
PRON
SCONJ

ADJ: adjective

Adjectives are words that typically modify nouns and specify their properties or attributes.

UD Finnish annotation follows VISK in assigning pro-adjectives the ADJ tag (e.g. tämä/PRON “this” → tällainen/ADJ “like this”; see e.g. VISK § 610; in Finnish).

Examples

References

edit ADJ

ADP: adposition

Adposition is a cover term for prepositions and postpositions.

Examples

References

edit ADP

ADV: adverb

Adverbs are words that typically modify adjectives, verbs or other adverbs for such categories as time, place, direction or manner.

Examples

References

edit ADV

AUX: auxiliary verb

An auxiliary verb is a verb that accompanies the lexical verb of a verb phrase and expresses grammatical distinctions not carried by the lexical verb, such as person, number, tense, mood, aspect, and voice.

Finnish modal verbs are counted as auxiliaries. Finnish auxiliary and modal verbs are

Examples

References

edit AUX

CCONJ: coordinating conjunction

A coordinating conjunction is a word that links words or larger constituents without syntactically subordinating one to the other and expresses a semantic relationship between them.

For subordinating conjunctions, see SCONJ.

In correlative (paired) coordinating conjuctions such as sekä - että “both - and” and joko - tai “either - or”, both words are annotated CCONJ (see also cc:preconj).

Examples

References

edit CCONJ

DET: determiner

Determiners are words that modify nouns or noun phrases and express the reference of the noun phrase in context.

Finnish has no true articles (see e.g. WALS) and many formalizations of Finnish morphology don’t involve a determiner (or related) tag. However, words such as yksi “one” and se “that” are used similarly to articles, especially in spoken language.

Examples

References

Diffs

Turku Dependency Treebank

No DET tag (or related) is annotated in TDT, and DET is not used in the current version of the UD Finnish corpus.

edit DET

INTJ: interjection

An interjection is a word that is used most often as an exclamation or part of an exclamation.

Examples

References

edit INTJ

NOUN: noun

Nouns inflect for case and number and denote things such as people, places, things, animals and ideas.

Proper nouns are not annotated as NOUN but rather PROPN.

Examples

References

edit NOUN

NUM: numeral

A numeral is a word, functioning most typically as a determiner, adjective or pronoun, that expresses a number and a relation to the number, such as quantity, sequence, frequency or fraction.

Examples

References

edit NUM

PART: particle

The UD Finnish annotation does not use the u-pos/PART part of speech. See ADV, ADP, CCONJ, SCONJ, INTJ for tags applying to words that have been termed “particles” in some descriptions of Finnish.

References

Diffs

FinnTreeBank

The FI_FTB-corpus follows the general UD documentation in recognizing the particle as a part-of-speech category. The specification between PART, ADV and ADP has been carried out as in ISK § 792 (in Finnish).

edit PART

PRON: pronoun

Pronouns are words that substitute for nouns or noun phrases, whose meaning is recoverable from the linguistic or extralinguistic context.

See also PronType.

Examples

References

edit PRON

PROPN: proper noun

A proper noun is a noun (or nominal content word) that is the name (or part of the name) of a specific individual, place, or object.

Acronyms of proper nouns, such as EU and YK, should be tagged PROPN.

Examples

References

edit PROPN

PUNCT: punctuation

Punctuation marks are non-alphabetical characters and character groups used to delimit linguistic units in printed text.

Examples

edit PUNCT

SCONJ: subordinating conjunction

A subordinating conjunction is a conjunction that links constructions by making one of them a constituent of the other.

Both the Finnish complementizer että and the comparative conjunction kuin are tagged SCONJ.

Examples

References

edit SCONJ

SYM: symbol

A symbol is a word-like entity that differs from ordinary words by form, function, or both.

Examples

edit SYM

VERB: verb

Verbs typically inflect for tense, mood and person and signal events and actions. Verbs can constitute a minimal predicate in a clause, and govern the number and types of other constituents which may occur in the clause.

Auxiliary and modal verbs are not annotated as VERB but rather AUX.

Examples

References

edit VERB

X: other

The tag X is used for words that for some reason cannot be assigned a real part-of-speech category.

Foreign words appearing inside native text are tagged X (see also Foreign).

Examples

edit X